Clockwork Oddities

A collection of costuming, crafting, oddments, bits, and whatnot.

New water bottle came in. With my ducky design on it. I’m kinda happy how it turned out.

grapeyguts:

kaon4shi:

alwaysenduphere:

Le génie du mal [The genius of evil, aka; Lucifer]; Guillaume Geefs 

“The statue was originally a commission for Geefs’ younger brother Joseph, who completed it in 1842 and installed it the following year. It generated controversy at once and was criticized for not representing a Christian ideal.The cathedral administration declared that “this devil is too sublime.” The local press intimated that the work was distracting the “pretty penitent girls” who should have been listening to the sermons.” [x]

[The original ‘sublime’ version shown below, and the ‘revised’ one in the photoset above]

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> Make sculpture of the devil

> No this sculpture is too hot for church

> Make another one

> It’s even hotter

ok the feet tho

(via shrimpfur)

Angel food cupcake with raspberry cream cheese icing. (Top left)

Lavender honey cupcake with rose whipped cream icing (Top right)

On my cupcake stand all together now. (Bottom)

crayonguy:

Bunny master post

Floof!

(via baconflavoredcosplay)

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

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So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

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It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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Read More

kilicanfilimeanyday:

youngjusticer:

"Let it burn."
Queen of the Flame, by Rika Chan.

Only version of this I’ve liked

Been looking for art like this actually.  Cool.  Or hot.  Either one.

kilicanfilimeanyday:

youngjusticer:

"Let it burn."

Queen of the Flame, by Rika Chan.

Only version of this I’ve liked

Been looking for art like this actually.  Cool.  Or hot.  Either one.

(via lady-ava-cosplay)

sir-brandothan:

How Frozen Should Have Ended

Yup.  Thought the same thing.  I lost it at the sing along bit, though >.> still giggling.

(via batlesbo)

lithefider:

Speaking of Crafty Advice Owl here were more Cosplay-specific ones we’d thought up but I never posted.  :)

That last one.  

I need to stop watching/reading/enjoying things.  I keep adding to my list.  (Most recent additions include Loki from Loki: Agent of Asgaurd and Lorna Dane’s Serval Industries uniform from the new X-Factor comics.)  I really need to stop this…

(via oshova750)

cultcouture:

Spring

I really would love to learn to do makeup like this.  Absolutely lovely!

cultcouture:

Spring

I really would love to learn to do makeup like this.  Absolutely lovely!

(via snerkaderp)